Latest NRAO News

RSS

Search Results

Search Terms: ALMA

Showing results 1 - 10 of 219
Artist's impression of a stream of gas being pulled away from a protoplanetary disk by an intruder object.
ALMA Catches “Intruder” Redhanded in Rarely Detected Stellar Flyby Event
January 11, 2022 at 12:07 pm | News Release

Scientists using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) and the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) made a rare detection of a likely stellar flyby event in the Z Canis Majoris (Z CMa) star system. An intruder—not bound to the system—object came in close proximity to and interacted with the environment surrounding the binary protostar, causing the formation of chaotic, stretched-out streams of dust and gas in the disk surrounding it.

Patricio Escarate works on an ALMA front end housing for receivers
ALMA’s Most Scientifically Productive Receiver Will Soon See Further than Ever Before
December 17, 2021 at 11:00 am | News Release

The National Science Foundation (NSF) and the board of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) have approved a multi-million dollar upgrade project for the Observatory’s 1.3mm (Band 6) receivers through the North American ALMA Development Program. The receivers—originally built, and to be upgraded, by the Central Development Laboratory (CDL) at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO)—are the most scientifically productive in ALMA’s lineup.

ALMA Scientists Detect Signs of Water in a Galaxy Far, Far Away
ALMA Scientists Detect Signs of Water in a Galaxy Far, Far Away
November 3, 2021 at 8:00 am | News Release

Water has been detected in the most massive galaxy in the early Universe, according to new observations from the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). Scientists studying SPT0311-58 found H20, along with carbon monoxide in the galaxy, which is located nearly 12.88 billion light years from Earth. Detection of these two molecules in abundance suggests that the molecular Universe was going strong shortly after the elements were forged in early stars. The new research comprises the most detailed study of molecular gas content of a galaxy in the early Universe to date and the most distant detection of H20 in a regular star-forming galaxy.

A Cosmic Whodunit: ALMA Study Confirms What’s Robbing Galaxies of Their Star-Forming Gas
A Cosmic Whodunit: ALMA Study Confirms What’s Robbing Galaxies of Their Star-Forming Gas
November 2, 2021 at 9:00 am | News Release

Astronomers examining the nearby Universe with the help of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) have just completed the largest high-resolution survey of star-forming fuel ever conducted in galaxy clusters. But more importantly, they’re tackling a long-standing mystery in astrophysics: what’s killing galaxies?

ALMA Scientists Uncover the Mystery of Early Massive Galaxies Running on Empty
ALMA Scientists Uncover the Mystery of Early Massive Galaxies Running on Empty
September 22, 2021 at 11:00 am | News Release

Early massive galaxies—those that formed in the three billion years following the Big Bang—should have contained large amounts of cold hydrogen gas, the fuel required to make stars. But scientists observing the early Universe with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) and the Hubble Space Telescope have spotted something strange: half a dozen early massive galaxies that ran out of fuel.

a bright blue young star with a cloud of cold gas surrounding it
ALMA Reveals Carbon-Rich, Organic Birth Environments of Planets
September 15, 2021 at 9:00 am | News Release

An international collaboration of scientists using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) has completed the most extensive chemical composition mapping of the protoplanetary disks around five nearby young stars at high resolution, producing images that capture the molecular composition associated with planetary births, and a roadmap for future studies of the makeup of planet- and comet-forming regions. The new study unlocks clues about the role of molecules in planetary system formation, and whether these young planetary systems in the making have what it takes to host life.

NSF Awards Funding for Next-Generation VLA Antenna Development
NSF Awards Funding for Next-Generation VLA Antenna Development
August 9, 2021 at 2:00 pm | News Release

The National Science Foundation has awarded NRAO $23 Million for design and development work on the Next Generation Very Large Array, a project proposed as one of the world’s next generation of cutting-edge astronomical research facilities. The award includes funding for producing a prototype antenna for this new radio telescope system.

Scientists Observe Gas Re-accretion in Dying Galaxies for the First Time
Scientists Observe Gas Re-accretion in Dying Galaxies for the First Time
July 29, 2021 at 8:00 am | News Release

A new study from scientists using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) suggests that previously displaced gases can re-accrete onto galaxies, potentially slowing down the process of galaxy death caused by ram pressure stripping, and creating unique structures more resistant to its effects.

False color image of protoplanetary disks side by side. Left is a ring disk showing blue scattered outer ring, green inner rings with gaps, and a yellow core. Center is a transition disk with a thin outer blue ring and thin green and yellow rings, and a large empty cavity in the center. Right is a compact small disk with thin blue and green rings, and a large inner yellow core with no gaps.
Mind the Gap: Scientists Use Stellar Mass to Link Exoplanets to Planet-Forming Disks
June 23, 2021 at 8:00 am | News Release

Using data for more than 500 young stars observed with the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA), scientists have uncovered a direct link between protoplanetary disk structures—the planet-forming disks that surround stars—and planet demographics. The survey proves that higher mass stars are more likely to be surrounded by disks with “gaps” in them and that these gaps directly correlate to the high occurrence of observed giant exoplanets around such stars. These results provide scientists with a window back through time, allowing them to predict what exoplanetary systems looked like through each stage of their formation.

Study of Young Chaotic Star System Reveals Planet Formation Secrets
Study of Young Chaotic Star System Reveals Planet Formation Secrets
June 17, 2021 at 9:00 am | News Release

A team of scientists using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) to study the young star Elias 2-27 have confirmed that gravitational instabilities play a key role in planet formation, and have for the first time directly measured the mass of protoplanetary disks using gas velocity data, potentially unlocking one of the mysteries of planet formation.

Showing results 1 - 10 of 219